Fox News alerts: cell phone radiation risk

Occasionally, the media gets it right. Tucker Carlson on iPhone testing at 5x higher than legal radiation limits: “Twenty years from now, we’re going to look at that and laugh bitterly, like one of those Camel ads with smoking doctors.”
Thanks to the advent of technology, we can access and share information through our phones at lightning speed. We use it to educate ourselves and keep updated with current events. We use it for entertainment, and we use it for work.

However, this advancement comes with a price. In the video above (and on YouTube here), Tucker Carlson talks about the health risks of using mobile phones, and why it’s crucial to raise awareness of this urgent matter.

Carlson states,

“The National Toxicology Program, a government organization, found that ‘high exposure to radiofrequency radiation used by cell phones was associated with clear evidence of tumors in rats.’

“In 2012, Italy’s Supreme Court upheld a ruling that said there was a link between a business executive’s brain tumor and his heavy use of a mobile phone.”

Phones Exceed the Legal Limits of Radiation Exposure

The main health-related criteria for a phone to be approved for sale by FCC is by ensuring the device will not exceed the maximum allowable Specific Absorption Rating (SAR). This standard, however, is much too relaxed and is not based on the existing body of science, but rather on the thermal effect only.

While the SAR rating is based on a heating effect only, thousands of studies indicate non-thermal effects, and thus conclude that the SAR limit is entirely inadequate.

But today’s phones are now proven to exceed even the SAR-based legal limit of radiation.

The Chicago Tribune tested almost a dozen of phones according to the federal guidelines at an FCC-accredited lab. According to the Tribune, iPhone 7, one of the most popular smartphones ever sold, measured over the legal limit and is more than twice the amount of what Apple has reported to the regulators from its own testing.

As mentioned by Tucker Carlson in the video, in another lawsuit against Apple and Samsung, a test in an FCC-accredited lab shows that at 0mm, iPhone 8 hits the user with 5 times more radiation than the federal exposure limit allows, while Samsung hits users up to 3 times the limit,

Poor Testing Standards and Lawsuit

The FCC allows manufacturers to test their phone’s radiofrequency radiation emissions from up to 25 millimeters away from the body.

However, when we talk to someone on the phone, we normally have it right beside our ears. And having our phones in our pockets puts it at 2mm or less away from our body, making the testing criteria inapplicable and useless.

Not to mention its “one-size-fits-all” approach that doesn’t consider children or pregnant users of these phones.

With all the screening and testing being done, keep in mind that only one phone needs to be tested before millions of phones go on sale. At the same time, manufacturers can select the testing lab.

These poor testing standards are not only inaccurate based on how people use their phones, but it also leaves too much room for inconsistency and perhaps, dishonesty, with the results reported to the FCC and the emissions of the actual phones that will be used by the consumer.

In a December 2019 class action lawsuit against Apple and Samsung stemming from the Tribune’s tests, a California judge called the FCC “dumb”, before moving the case to trial.

(NOTE: While this story was updated here, there are indications that pressure was likely applied by industry and/or their captured agencies to change the story in an attempt to deflect focus from the FCC as a culpable party, so there was perhaps more accuracy in the originally-published story.)

Phone Manufacturers Are Deceiving Us

One of the most censored subjects in the USA according to American organization Project Censored, the Phonegate Scandal revealed the general deception by phone manufacturers about the real exposure values of SAR (the unit used to measure RFR absorption rate).

With the Tribune’s tests, Apple disputed the results, stating that the tests were not done the way Apple does them, without going to the specifics of what was out of the ordinary, and did not respond to requests for clarification.

These and other obvious efforts to mask the truth from the consumers and hide the fact that we are being overexposed to harmful radiofrequency radiation is a serious matter that concerns all of us.

Sadly, there is not yet enough conversation in the country about this issue and our health and safety are being sidelined.

With 5G being deployed despite no testing that indicates it is safe, this makes the issue critically urgent.

There are far too few stories like this in our mainstream media, which is heavily influenced by advertising dollars and business arrangements with wireless companies.

With almost non-existent media attention, it’s up to us to spread the word and help make our voices louder until we are heard, and until action is taken to ensure the health and safety of our community.

As Tucker Carlson correctly says,

“Twenty years from now, we’re going to look at that and laugh bitterly, like one of those Camel ads with smoking doct

T

graphic video on cell phone brain hazards

someone put steel wool around the cell and when it receives it lights up the wool. So what does it do to your brain? {wait past the ad]

Boston Globe article warns cell phone health hazards Jan 2019

Many scientists say exposure to electromagnetic fields may pose a health hazard. They’re especially concerned about cellphones, because of their position close to the user’s head.

 

By Hiawatha Bray GLOBE STAFF  JANUARY 17, 2019

A California health activist says the Massachusetts Department of Public Health may be withholding information about possible health risks posed by cellphones and other wireless technologies.

Joel Moskowitz, director of the Center for Family and Community Health at the University of California Berkeley, said the state agency is refusing to release fact sheets about the health effects of electromagnetic fields, or EMF, that it began drafting two years ago.

“The higher-ups are very nervous about letting any of this information out to the public,” said Moskowitz. In California, Moskowitz fought a successful seven-year court battle to force that state to release guidelines for consumers on safe cellphone use.

Ann Scales, a spokeswoman for the Massachusetts agency, said the DPH plans to release the guidelines within six months.

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Moskowitz and some other activists assert that exposure to EMF, the energy given off by countless modern devices, causes a variety of health problems, ranging from sleep loss to brain cancer. They say state and federal agencies have a duty to warn the public to reduce their exposure to EMF.

But both the World Health Organization and the US Centers for Disease Control and Preventionhave said that evidence of health risks from EMF is inconclusive.

Moskowitz has joined forces with Cecelia Doucette, an Ashland resident and EMF activist who persuaded her town’s school district to set limits on student exposure to Wi-Fi radio waves. Doucette said she worked with Mass. DPH officials in 2016 to develop a fact sheet showing people how to shield themselves from Wi-Fi waves, as well as electromagnetic radiation from cellphones, cell towers, and high-voltage electric power lines.

But more than two years later, the fact sheet has yet to be released. “I don’t know why,” Doucette said. “They have not given me a reason aside from the fact that it is still under review.”

Moskowitz filed a public records request for the fact sheets with the Mass. DPH, but it was denied. Public records liaison Carolyn Wagner wrote that the document in question is exempt from the state’s disclosure law because it’s still in draft form.

Scales said that until the DPH releases its guidelines, consumers can find out about safe cellphone use from the National Institutes of Health’s National Cancer Institute, which has a Web page devoted to the subject.

Many scientists agree that EMF exposure may pose a health hazard. They’re especially concerned about cellphones, because of their position so close to the user’s head, thereby increasing the brain’s exposure to the phone’s electromagnetic field.

“The evidence that prolonged use of cellphones increases the risk of brain cancer is extremely strong,” said David Carpenter, professor of environmental health sciences at the University at Albany, State University of New York.

Carpenter pointed to recent large-scale studies in the United States and Italy that found that exposure to cellphone radio waves caused brain tumors in rats, as well as earlier studies that found evidence of increased cancer rates among heavy cellphone users.

“The degree of risk is debatable,” Carpenter said. “However, that there is a risk is really pretty clear.”

Richard Clapp, professor emeritus at Boston University’s School of Public Health, agreed. He recommended that consumers use wired earbuds to make calls instead of holding the handset to their ears.

“There’s good reason for being cautious,” Clapp said. “If you don’t have to expose yourself or you can reduce your exposure, do that.”

The World Health Organization states on its website that “to date there is no evidence to conclude that exposure to low level electromagnetic fields is harmful to human health.” Yet the WHO also lists electromagnetic fields as a “possible carcinogen.”

The controversy is likely to intensify in the years ahead with the deployment of next-generation 5G wireless systems, which operate at higher frequencies than today’s cellular systems and will require a far more transmitters.

“5G is going to put an antenna every several hundred yards in cities,” Moskowitz said. “The exposure will be substantial.”

The nation’s wireless companies plan to spend billions on 5G networks, and the Trump administration considers quick deployment of the technology a matter of national security. But Markowitz and other health activists want a moratorium on 5G technology pending more research on health risks.

Hiawatha Bray can be reached at hiawatha.bray@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter @GlobeTechLab.